Baby Nurse, Night Nanny, or Newborn Care Specialist, Which One do I Need?

Have you ever wondered what the difference between a baby nurse, night nanny and newborn care specialist is? Yes, so have I. This is what I found out:

What is a Baby Nurse or Night Nurse

The terms night nurse or Baby Nurse is an outdated terms often used for describing a night nanny or newborn care specialist. What we mean today when we say baby nurse is something distinctly different. A nurse is a Licensed Registered Nurse (RN), Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) or even a Licensed Vocational Nurse (LVN). Nurses are professionals that undergo extensive biomedical training. They earn degrees, take exams, obtain state licensing to work and earn the title of nurses. Nurses work in clinics, hospitals, or as travel nurses in many specializations including baby and new mother care. Some of these extremely caring and knowledgeable women (and men) also work in private homes to aid you and your family with your overnight infant care needs. Hence the term Baby Nurses still being used today. Some nurses are newborn care specialists (NCS) but not all NCSs are nurses . *I suggest hiring a licensed registered nurse for in home care when your baby requires extensive medical care.

Here at Holistic Bebe, I prefer to use the term night nannying or newborn care specialists instead of baby nurses to describe what I do. Here’s why…

Night Nanny

A nanny usually works under the direct guidance of the parents and requires no specialized training. When I first started, prior to my NCS training and graduating with a degree in Human Biology from UCLA this is exactly what I did. I started off as a night nanny and then later moved to help the same family during the day as baby grew older. Nannies can stay with a family for years, as I did, while an NCSs only stays up to three or four months. Nannies can offer help with a wide range of tasks, some are willing to prepare meals, do dishes, fold laundry, care for sibling and pets etc. Know that these things fall outside the general duties of a Newborn Care Specialist, which I will describe next.

Newborn Care Specialist

Newborn Care Specialists (NCS) are highly experienced individuals who have chosen to specialize in newborn and infant care. They undergo specialized training in newborn care (I did mine with Gentle Ventures) and have advanced knowledge in a wide variety of subject areas including lactation support and sleep conditioning.

An NCS is an expert who will work with you for the first weeks and months of your newborn’s life to establish feeding and healthy sleep habits. Typical duties of NCS include : feeding the baby — or bringing the baby to mom to breastfeed — changing diapers, and getting the baby back to sleep, they can also clean bottles and pump parts, and do baby laundry. More importantly, “a skilled NCS will be able to create good routines for the baby and work toward sleeping through the night, usually by 12 weeks of age.” New mamas have often told me that hiring an NCS was the best decision they made providing them sanity, support, and much-needed sleep.

To answer the question, what is a baby nurse, night nanny or newborn care specialist? And Which one do I need? Your family’s specific needs and concerns will determine whether or not you need a night nanny, Newborn Care Specialist, or licensed baby nurse. As a Holistic Newborn Care Specialist, I have extensive experience working with infants. I’ve also worked with babies that have special needs such as: supplemental nursing system (SNS), have reflux, allergies, colic or other medical issues. I am equipped to care for your infant when you are ready to bring them home. If you are looking for the best newborn care in Los Angeles and Orange County please feel free to contact me.

Jenne

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